Laurel Halo

Michigan’s Laurel Halo possibly makes some of the most unsettling pop songs I have ever heard. Carcass from her debut album Quarantine is one such example, with synths dripping with sheer menace and an air of the supernatural, percussion bounces from many surfaces, almost tribal like in its personality and her voice manipulated into a shrill, terrifying banshee is likely to haunt you forever. Despite this, I always come back to it like a glutton for punishment because she has an undeniable talent for making memorable electronic music, no matter how mainstream, dream-like, avant-garde or experimental it is.

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